PAULUS BERENSOHN
Finding One’s Way with Clay

$26.50

Finding One’s Way With Clay: Creating Pinched Pottery and Working With Colored Clays
25th Anniversary Edition, published 1997
Paulus Berensohn,  with photographs by True Kelly
Paperback (new)
8.5 x 11 inches, 160 pages

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SKU: PB Categories: , , ,

Description

Do something. Start with pleasure. Make a list of all the things that are pleasurable in your life and then make an art form out of one of them. And if you’re courageous, make a list of all the things that are difficult in your life and make an art form out of one of them. -Paulus Berensohn, speaking in the film To Spring from the Hand

We are pleased to offer copies of Paulus Berensohn’s treasured book, “Finding One’s Way with Clay”.

Penland was recently gifted a wonderful supply of the 25th anniversary paperback edition. The original hardcover book was first published in 1972, and later republished in 1997 by Biscuit Books, Inc.

Thanks to the generous family of the late Angela Gallia (Biscuit Books publisher) we are able to offer the book again. Purchases are available in person at the Penland Gallery or Penland Supply Store and online via our SHOP. Proceeds from the sales will benefit Penland School. Cost is the original 1997 cover price of $26.50 + shipping. Books will be shipped via USPS Priority mail.

NOTE: Please enter the number of books you wish to purchase (up to 6) and then select the appropriate shipping from the drop down menu. If you are combining this order with other items, shipping costs may need to be adjusted. 

For international orders please contact store@penland.org to arrange shipping and payment.

About Paulus

Paulus Berensohn (1933-2017) was a dancer, potter and teacher whose slower, quieter, more mindful approach to pottery influenced a generation of artists.

Berensohn was perhaps best known for the book “Finding One’s Way With Clay” (1972), a guide to making pinch pots that blended instructions for making these simple clay bowls with reflections on art, the environment and spirituality, and that advanced the idea that creativity was universal. (from NY Times)

Paulus Berensohn