JASON HARTSOE
Striped Box

$150.00

Jason Hartsoe
Striped Box
Wheel thrown and altered stoneware, slip, stain, and glaze
12.25H x 4.25W x 4.25D inches
Item #80-30

1 in stock

SKU: 80-30 Categories: , , Tags: , , , , ,

Description

“My work relies on the acknowledgment of antecedents. I believe that successful art requires a firm foundation in the work that came before it. It operates by recognizing and capitalizing on the surprising unity and collective nature of seemingly disparate ceramic traditions. The common language of forms created by the diverse cultures of our world, crossing the myriad technological divides are all dictated by themes of functionality and a common human scale.

I look not only to the forms themselves but also to the traditional methods used to make them. I have pursued my education through the process of apprenticeship and working closely with other master potters, beginning in Japan and continuing through England and here in the US. This slow education allowed for an organic training and development of the eye for form and instructed the hand in how to respond to the material.

As a functional potter I am unapologetically deeply reverent of tradition. However, I demand that my work resist a static complacency in merely the replication of the past. The challenge of my studio practice is to escape the dangers of the derivative and to allow the free experimentation with preexisting fundamentals and to synthesize them with a fresh, contemporary approach and consideration. My design is to encourage something new from the past and in so doing, to create something vital and lasting. It is my hope that perhaps it will succeed in demonstrating a kind of new translation of the better themes of our functional forms.” – Jason Hartsoe

Artist Info

Jason Hartsoe – Penland, NC
Jason grew up in NC in a home full of pots made by his grandfathers and their fathers before them. After receiving a BA in English from Belmont College, in NC, Jason chose to pursue a ceramic education by apprenticing with master potters; he learned on the job as an assistant
in England at Winchcombe Pottery, in Virginia with Dan Finnegan, and as an apprentice with Michael Hunt and Naomi Daglish at Bandana Pottery just down the road from Penland. Jason’s work reflects these influences and experiences and has continued to evolve during short residencies in Star, NC; Shigaraki, Japan; and Cortona, Italy. During his residency at Penland, Jason is building a wheel in order to explore larger forms, establishing his own studio for the first time, developing his voice as a maker, and seeking an audience and market for his work.