DAVID CLEMONS
Jar

$450.00

David Clemons
Jar No. 1
Pewter
3H x 3W x 3D inches
Item #76-22

1 in stock

SKU: 76-22 Categories: , , Tags: , ,

Description

This product is constructed with cast Pewter, an alloy made from tin (Sn 92%), antimony (Sb7.5%), and copper (Cu.5%). Pewter has a relatively low melting temperature between 420F-500F and is not suitable for heating with a direct flame or within an oven. Pewter is nonreactive and food safe. Even though it is nonreactive if salt is stored in the jar and you live in a humid climate, the salt can accelerate the natural oxidation or darkening of the interior. The exterior has been oxidized or artificially darkened and rubbed back to accentuate the surface texture. The exterior is sealed with a buffed beeswax finish. The interior is the raw metal with a brushed surface. This container should be hand washed only with a mild detergent, rinsed with water and hand dried. Over time the material may need additional maintenance. If the pewter develops unwanted dark splotches or a dull greyish haze, clean it with soapy 0000 steel wool, rinse and dry. The wax surface will usually only require mild buffing with a terry cloth rag to refresh the satin luster. If the wax finish must be repaired apply any beeswax based cutting board or salad bowl finish and buff the finish once it has dried.

Artist Info

David Clemons – Penland, NC
David was born in El Paso, Texas and spent much of his life in Austin, Texas. Initially he began his undergraduate career attending Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, pursuing a combined degree program for biology art and pre-med. He attended the program for two years before returning to Austin to complete his BFA at the University of Texas in Austin, with a primary emphasis in painting. He earned his MFA in metalsmithing in 2007 from San Diego State University. David taught in the art department at the University of Arkansas in Little Rock, Arkansas for the past ten years. During eight of those years he developed and was the head of the Metalsmithing and Jewelry Department. His work embraces the craft of metalsmithing and its collected history of techniques and objects. The resulting works rendered in metal, mixed media, and hand made artist books are vehicles to communicate ideas surrounding identity and forays into material and process-based work. He has work included in the collections of the Arkansas Art Center, National Ornamental Metal Museum, and the Yale Contemporary Craft Collection.