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Wood Summer Session 4

Wood Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Michael Puryear
Working in a Vacuum

This workshop will dig into the various uses for the vacuum bag in woodworking. We’ll cover basic veneering, curved panel forming, bent lamination, template routing, and using the vacuum as a holding device. This is a technique-oriented workshop; students may apply the information covered to sculpture or functional pieces. Intermediate level: basic hand- and power-tool skills required. 

Designer, furniture maker; teaching: Parsons The New School of Design (NYC), State University of New York-Purchase, Anderson Ranch (CO), Center for Furniture Craftsmanship (ME), Penland; exhibitions: Museum of Arts and Design (NYC), Peabody-Essex Museum (MA); collections: Newark Museum (NJ), National Museum of African American History and Culture (DC); publications: Makers: An Anthology of American Studio Craft, Furniture with Soul. 

michaelpuryear.com

Michael Puryear, Rocker, ash, 42 x 37 inches
Michael Puryear, Rocker, ash, 42 x 37 inches
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Textiles B Summer Session 4

Textiles Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Adele Stafford
Cloth Is Material

This workshop will be a rich examination of the materiality of fiber and its narrative influence on handwoven cloth and our design process. We’ll trace fiber stories from origin through finished works. Ranging from the last organic cotton farmers in West Texas to the importance of Landrace wool cultivation, discussions will touch on fiber agriculture and processing, sustainability, and cultural ownership. Through sketching, writing, and sampling, students will be asked to create woven work deeply integrating material and form. We’ll cover a variety of fundamental weaving drafts, hand finishing methods, and decorative weaving techniques including leno and overlay. All levels. Lower textiles studio.

Studio artist, vice president of client services at Higg Co, providing sustainability assessment tools to apparel and textile industries; Albers Foundation Research Residency (CT); lectures: Museum Design Summit (Santa Fe), DO Lectures (CA); collections: Rhode Island School of Design.

voicesofindustry.com

Adele Stafford, Fragments of Appalachia, Black Thorn Farm wool, overshot float
Adele Stafford, Fragments of Appalachia, Black Thorn Farm wool, overshot float
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Print & Letterpress L Summer Session 4

Print & Letterpress Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Bill Moran and Jim Moran
On the Record

In this workshop we’ll delve into the Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum’s vast collection to create letterpress album covers using halftone blocks of forgotten musicians and vocal groups of the 1950s and 1960s. Students will design their own cover and add text using wood type from Hamilton along with Penland’s type collection. Minor research into the musicians will allow us to set the back cover, including song titles, band members, and brief information. Our design, layout, typesetting, and printing will evoke the music of the era. All levels. Letterpress studio.

Bill: artistic director emeritus at Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum (WI), third-generation printer; teacher of typography and printing history at University of Minnesota; exhibitions: Tipoteca Italiana (Italy), Country Music Hall of Fame (Nashville), Gutenberg Museum (Germany), Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum.

letterbugs.net | @billstype

Jim: master printer, collections officer, and former director at Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum (WI), third-generation printer; teaching: AIGA, HOW Design, Atypl, and TypeCon conferences, University of Quebec, Tipoteca Italiana (Italy); residencies: Wells College (NY), Hatch Show Print (Nashville), Tipoteca Italiana. 

woodtype.org | @jimmyonthepress 

Jim Moran, Rodeo, Rodeo, letterpress, 40 x 26 inches
Jim Moran, Rodeo, Rodeo, letterpress, 40 x 26 inches
Bill Moran, LetterBee, letterpress, wood type, foundry type, 24 x 18 inches
Bill Moran, LetterBee, letterpress, wood type, foundry type, 24 x 18 inches
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Print & Letterpress X Summer Session 4

Print & Letterpress Summer Session 4
July 3–15
John Hitchcock
Screenprint Demo City!

This workshop will focus on the post-matrix and pushing the surfaces of paper, wood, and fabric. We’ll work with water-based screenprinting and low-tech stencil methods, stressing the current trends of print media in contemporary culture. Demonstrations will include hand-cut and photo stencils, manipulation of the surface, sculptural prints, hand dyeing, sewing, drawing back into, and water soluble markers as we create experimental, unique prints. We’ll emphasize gaining both proficiency in the techniques and an awareness of how these skills can be used within the larger cultural context. All levels. Printmaking studio.

Professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison; grants: Robert Rauschenberg Foundation (NYC), Jerome Foundation (MN); solo exhibitions: American Culture Center (Shanghai), Missoula Art Museum (MT), Mulvane Art Museum (KS), Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (Santa Fe).

hybridpress.net | @hybridpress

John Hitchcock, She Scattered Her Beads on the Table, screenprint and acrylic paint on wooden panel, 30 x 30 x 2 inches
John Hitchcock, She Scattered Her Beads on the Table, screenprint and acrylic paint on wooden panel, 30 x 30 x 2 inches
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Photography Summer Session 4

Photo Summer Session 4
July 3–15
David Samuel Stern
Focused Photography

I believe that when photography is used as a tool for making art, your results should reflect predetermined, honed ideas. Students will begin by assembling a collection of reference images, preliminary studies, and sketches. Then they will determine technical strategies, equipment, and materials; make mockups; execute three photoshoots; and review and refine the results. We’ll cover a flexible range of technical skills based on each student’s project as it evolves. Demonstration will be based on digital technology, but students comfortable with film cameras and darkroom printing are welcome to use an analog workflow. Each student, whether a beginner or an experienced photographer, will complete a small body of work in which nothing was left to chance. All levels.

Studio artist: teaching: Brooklyn Brainery (NYC), New York Botanical Garden, Pratt Institute (NYC); residencies: Ostrobothnian Photography Centre (Finland); Vermont Studio Center; editorial commissions: National Geographic, California Sunday Magazine, Brooklyn Academy of Music; representation: Marshall Contemporary (CA), Robert Fontaine Gallery (FL).

davidsamuelstern.com | @dsamuelstern

David Samuel Stern, Untitled Woven Portrait 2, three photographic prints on translucent vellum, cut and woven together by hand, 31 x 24 inches
David Samuel Stern, Untitled Woven Portrait 2, three photographic prints on translucent vellum, cut and woven together by hand, 31 x 24 inches
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Metals B Summer Session 4

Metals Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Georgina Treviño
Make it Editorial!

Working intuitively and quickly, students in this workshop will explore what it means to make statement jewelry–the kind that might be used for fashion shoots. Creating this kind of editorial work is all about working under pressure. You can’t overthink it. This workshop will push you to make, make, make! We’ll start with basic metal techniques such as piercing, drilling, soldering, and cold connections. Then we’ll use these techniques to experiment with other materials such as resin, found objects, and clothing. We’ll work collaboratively, make a lot of pieces, and have a good time. We’ll also discuss pricing and styling and set aside a full day to document our final pieces. All levels. Lower metals studio.

Studio artist: residencies: Arrowmont Pentaculum (TN), Penland winter residency; exhibitions: Schmuck 2015 (Germany), Racine Art Museum (WI), New York Jewelry Week (NYC), Fotocopy (Italy), Collar Works Gallery (NY); collections: Museum of Arts and Design (NYC), OHMYBLUE Gallery (Italy); publications: Vogue, Elle, Los Angeles Times, Allure, Metalsmith.

georginatrevinojewelry.com | @georginatrevino

Georgina Treviño, Tribal, upcycled hat, brass, zirconia, findings
Georgina Treviño, Tribal, upcycled hat, brass, zirconia, findings
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Metals A Summer Session 4

Metals Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Aaron Decker
Enameling in the Round

In this workshop students will explore techniques for enameling on 3D surfaces. We’ll experiment, take risks, and problem-solve during a thorough investigation into enamel as a material for 3D forms. We’ll also delve into enameling techniques such as wet packing, enamel painting, and plique-à-jour. We’ll translate drawing, painting, or sketches into opportunities to explore pattern, shape, and the surface qualities of enamel. Students should be able to complete 10-15 tiles/pieces, but the core of this workshop will be creative problem-solving and getting to know the material. All levels. Upper metals studio.

Studio artist, production development manager at Shinola Detroit; Windgate Fellowship, Mercedes Benz Emerging Artist, Marzee Prize (Netherlands); collections: Yale University Art Gallery (CT), Rotasa Foundation (CA), Enamel Arts Foundation (CA); representation: Ornamentum Gallery (NY), Marzee Gallery (Netherlands), Beyond Gallery (VT), OONA Galerie (Berlin), Galerie Noel Guyomarc’h (Canada). 

aaron-decker.com | @aaronpdecker

Aaron Decker, Yellow Bird Bomb, silver, enamel, copper, 4-1/2 x 2 x 3-1/2 inches
Aaron Decker, Yellow Bird Bomb, silver, enamel, copper, 4-1/2 x 2 x 3-1/2 inches
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Iron Summer Session 4

Iron Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Andrew Hayes
Truth in Fabrication

In this workshop we’ll use the fabrication tools of the iron studio to make sculpture and functional pieces. Introductory projects will cover layout, cutting, grinding, forming, welding, and finishing. Then students will be free to design their own work with the goal of leaving with well-considered, completed projects. All skill levels and interests welcome. Together we’ll find the truth in fabrication. 

Studio artist; teaching: Haystack (ME), Anderson Ranch (CO), Penland; North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship, South Arts Fellowship; former Penland core fellow and resident artist; exhibitions: Seager Gray Gallery (CA), Blue Spiral 1 (NC), James Gallery (PA), JHB Gallery (NYC); collections: Yale Art Museum (CT), Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Arkansas Art Center. 

Andrew-Hayes.squarespace.com | @andrew_hayes_studio

Andrew Hayes, Cavity, fabricated steel, book paper, 13 x 11 x 6 inches
Andrew Hayes, Cavity, fabricated steel, book paper, 13 x 11 x 6 inches
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Glass B Summer Session 4

Glass Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Anne Petters
The Poetics of Glass

In this idea-based, experimental workshop, we’ll explore a specific kilnforming, pâte de verre process. Using a variety of mold-making materials (plaster, silica, wax, clay, fiber frax, alginate), this technique will allow us to transfer drawings, handwriting, and structures from a mold onto glass. Starting with fusing glass sheets that carry our individual designs, we’ll continue into three dimensions by manipulating the glass in the kiln during the firing as well as exploring various slumping methods. Understanding the aesthetic qualities and sculptural potential of this technique will be the backbone for developing new ideas. All levels. Kiln studio.

Studio artist; teaching: City and Guilds of London Art School (UK), Royal College of Art (London), Institute for Ceramic and Glass (Germany); Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust scholar; residencies: Pilchuck (WA), Edinburgh College of Art; exhibitions: Michelangelo Foundation (Venice), Bullseye Projects (UK), Sue Schiepers Gallery (Belgium).

annepetters.com | @annepetters

Anne Petters, Books of Disquiet, glass, 11-3/4 x 7 x 6 inches each
Anne Petters, Books of Disquiet, glass, 11-3/4 x 7 x 6 inches each
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Glass A Summer Session 4

Glass Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Jason McDonald
But Is It Efficient?

In this workshop we’ll take a deep dive into some of the most common mistakes glassblowers make. We’ll build from the foundations up, starting with how to set up for your blow slot. Taking a critical approach to the reasons behind the moves we use in the hot shop, we’ll seek to dispel the notion that the material is magic and focus instead on the physics behind why things happen. By the end of the session, we’ll identify patterns of behavior that don’t serve you as a maker and establish a rigorous process for evaluating the moves you want to add to your routines. And we may even have some fun while doing it! Advanced beginner level: at least one prior glass workshop required. Hot glass studio. 

Studio artist, MFA candidate at Tyler School of Art and Architecture (Philadelphia); production glassblower at The Glass Eye (Seattle); teaching: Public Glass (CA), Redmond School of Glass (WA), The Studio at Corning (NY), Pittsburgh Glass Center; Windgate Fellowship; contestant on season 2 of the Netflix show, “Blown Away.” 

jasonmcdonaldglass.com | @jasonmcdonald42

Jason McDonald, Black Figure Number 2, blown and engraved glass, steel, paint, 12 x 6 x 4 inches
Jason McDonald, Black Figure Number 2, blown and engraved glass, steel, paint, 12 x 6 x 4 inches
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Drawing & Painting Summer Session 4

Drawing & Painting Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Curtis Bartone
Beyond Tradition

This workshop will begin by introducing students to the basics of drawing and the properties of traditional drawing media: graphite, silverpoint, charcoal, conté, ink line, ink washes, colored pencils, and pastels. We’ll discuss various papers and their properties as each technique is introduced. This foundation will serve as a springboard for experimentation and personal expression as students are encouraged to move beyond drawing as simply a means to an end. All levels. 

Studio artist, teacher at Savannah College of Art and Design (SC); grants: Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation (CA), Illinois Arts Council; residencies: Koli (Finland), Playa (OR), Emmanuel College (MA); solo exhibitions: Telfair Museum (GA), Alberta Printmakers (Canada), Morris Graves Museum of Art (CA); collections: Telfair Museum (SC), Block Museum at Grinnell College (IA).

curtisbartone.com | @cabartone

Curtis Bartone, Process, graphite on paper, 20 x 15 inches
Curtis Bartone, Process, graphite on paper, 20 x 15 inches
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Clay B Summer Session 4

Clay Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Bobby Scroggins
Direct Hollow-Core Construction

This workshop will present a method of clay sculpting that will expedite figurative projects, facilitating the completion and firing of flawless pieces in a short time frame relative to scale and complexity. This is an ideal approach for art teachers and figurative sculptors who want to eliminate firing losses. While most traditional methods of clay sculpting call for making hollow forms through slab or coil methods, this process involves rapid construction over temporary armatures, eliminating most structural concerns. We’ll cover maquette making, armature building, clay modeling, glazing, and firing. We’ll work with white stoneware and fire to cone 6 oxidation. All levels. Lower clay studio.

Professor of ceramics and sculpture at University of Kentucky, faculty and former chair of visual arts at The Kentucky Governor’s School for the Arts; work in exhibitions and collections through the U.S. and abroad; publications: The Craft and Art of Clay, Contemporary Ceramics.

Bobby Scroggins, Family, ceramic, 36 x 26 x 26 inches
Bobby Scroggins, Family, ceramic, 36 x 26 x 26 inches
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Clay A Summer Session 4

Clay Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Lindsay Oesterritter
Innovation, One Pot at a Time

This workshop will focus on the investigations and explorations involved in creating and refining functional pottery. Using primarily stoneware clay, we’ll work on the wheel and use handbuilding techniques, including slab, carving, and coil. Investigations will include bisque molds, spouts and handles, mark making, and incorporating inspirations. While our focus will be on exploration, you can expect to take home up to three completed new forms and many more experiments and ideas to develop later. Bisque fire only. All levels. Upper clay studio.

Studio artist; co-organizer of Objective Clay and National Clay Week; teaching: Western Kentucky University, Arrowmont (TN), Archie Bray (MT), Watershed (ME); residencies; Arrowmont, Strathnairn Arts Association (AU); exhibitions: Flower City Arts Center (NY), Old Church Pottery Show (NJ), Art of the Pot (TX), Worcester Center for Crafts, Smithsonian Craft Show (DC), author of Mastering Kilns and Firing: Raku, Pit and Barrel, Wood Firing, and More (Quarry Books).

loceramics.com | @alindsayo

Lindsay Oesterritter, Juicers, iron-rich stoneware, 5 x 4-1/2 x 4-1/2 inches
Lindsay Oesterritter, Juicers, iron-rich stoneware, 5 x 4-1/2 x 4-1/2 inches
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Books & Paper P Summer Session 4

Books & Paper Summer Session 4
July 3–15
Tatiana Ginsberg
Layering Paper: Creating Imagery

We’ll explore mark-making techniques for wet paper–including pulp painting, embedding, blow outs, stenciling, and watermarks–and how to layer them to create imagery. Students will learn to prepare a number of Eastern and Western fibers and to color them with pigments and natural dyes. With this expanded vocabulary of papermaking possibilities, students can create unique works, editions, or sheets that might later be worked on dry. No experience necessary, just a willingness to work hard in this physically demanding workshop. All levels. Papermaking studio.

Director of artistic projects and master collaborator at Dieu Donné Paper Mill (NY); teaching: Mount Holyoke College (MA), Women’s Studio Workshop (NY), University of Iowa Center for the Book (IA), University of California-Santa Barbara (CA); awards: Fulbright graduate research grant (Japan), College Book Art Association Emerging Educator Award; representation: Verne Gallery (OH).

tatianaginsberg.art | @tsgpaper

Tatiana Ginsberg, Punch VII, abaca, linen, cotton, pigment, 34 x 30 inches
Tatiana Ginsberg, Punch VII, abaca, linen, cotton, pigment, 34 x 30 inches
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Books & Paper B Summer Session 4

Books & Paper Summer Session 4
Session 4: July 3–15
Maria Veronica San Martin
Creating Artists’ Books

Students in this workshop will create artists’ books by examining their history, concepts, aesthetics, and techniques. We’ll start by looking at examples and asking basic questions about artists’ books: What are they? How do they differ from traditional books? What is their place in visual art and cultural criticism? Then we’ll cover collage, painting, drawing, and hand printing methods along with a variety of adhesive and nonadhesive bookbinding techniques. Finally we’ll work together to find ways to interpret messages through different book formats as students conceptualize and create their own projects. Students will learn to build content, forms, and 3D spaces by means of artists’ books. All levels. Books studio.

Studio artist, teaching at the Center for Book Arts (NY), Universidad Catolica and Universidad de Chile; grants: two New York Foundation for the Arts NYFA and three Chilean National grants; biennials: The Immigrant Artist Biennial (NY);  residencies: Whitney Museum ISP; scholar Center for Book Arts, Art OMI (NY); solo exhibitions: Museum Meermanno (ND), BRIC (Brooklyn), Center for Book Arts (NY), Museum of Memory, National Archive, and Animal Gallery (Chile); collections: MET (NY), Center Pompidou (FR), Walker Art Center (MN), National Center for Contemporary Art (CL).

mveronicasanmartin.com | @san.martin.maria

Maria Veronica San Martin, In Their Memory: Human Rights Violations: Chile, 1973–1990, paper, screenprinting, digital printing, handsewn accordion binding, 7-1/2 x 12-1/4 x 1-1/2 inches, extends to 50 inches
Maria Veronica San Martin, In Their Memory: Human Rights Violations: Chile, 1973–1990, paper, screenprinting, digital printing, handsewn accordion binding, 7-1/2 x 12-1/4 x 1-1/2 inches, extends to 50 inches