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Everything Must Go

Core fellows from left to right: Devyn Vasquez, Katherine Toler, Joshua James Fredock, Stormie Burns, Sarah Rose Lejeune, Kento Saisho, L Gnadinger, Corey Pemberton, Elliot Earl Keeley
Programs director Leslie Noell addresses each core fellow at the opening reception.
A view of the show during viewing hours in Northlight
"Everything Must Go" viewed from the back of the gallery
Students, family, friends, and community members enjoying the show during the opening reception
Viewing hours run through November 14!
Stormie Burns and Sarah Rose Lejeune, “Just Some Baskets,” porcelain, glaze, luster, cotton, linen
Stormie Burns, "Triangle Bowl and Dash Cup," cast glass
Joshua James Fredock, “Bubble Cage,” steel, glass
Joshua James Fredock, “Vessel and Vase,” raised copper, hot glass
L Gnadinger, “Smaller Dangers 2,” layered abaca and cotton, graphite, wax, found danger
L Gnadinger, “Memorial 2,” cast bronze, housings
Elliot Earl Keeley, “Not in Use,” steel, wood, plastic, mixed media
Elliot Earl Keeley, “Divisions 2,” mixed media on paper
Sarah Rose Lejeune, “Worry Dolls,” cast bronze, copper
Sarah Rose Lejeune, “Loads,” handwoven cotton, silk, stainless steel
Corey Pemberton, “Untitled,” acrylic, inkjet print, sumi ink, panel
Corey Pemberton, “I have nothing to wear,” acrylic, bamboo parquetry, inkjet print on panel
Kento Saisho, “Still life,” ambrotype
Kento Saisho, “Untitled,” forged and fabricated steel, graphite
Katherine Toler and Devyn Vasquez, “Dog Party” (detail), plywood, found objects
Katherine Toler, “window seat,” monoprint, chine collé
Devyn Vasquez, “Checkered Brush,” birdseye maple, horse hair; “Bubble Brush,” ash, goat hair
Devyn Vasquez, “Passing Through,” airbrush on paper

Every year, the annual Core Fellowship Exhibition is a highlight of fall concentrations and an exciting opportunity to peek into the worlds of our core fellows as they explore new materials, ideas, and techniques across studios. This year’s, titled Everything Must Go, was certainly no exception. It featured the work of 2018-2019 core fellows Stormie Burns, Joshua James Fredock, L Gnadinger, Elliot Earl Keeley, Sarah Rose Lejeune, Corey Pemberton, Kento Saisho, Katherine Toler, and Devyn Vasquez. They curated and installed the show themselves in the Gallery North space of the new Northlight complex. The work ranged from delicate pâte de verre vessels to airbrushed paintings, with a strong unifying thread of experimentation and craftsmanship. 

Congratulations on a beautiful installation, core fellows!

Everything Must Go will be on display through November 14, 2018. Viewing hours are Wednesdays noon – 3:00 PM, Saturdays noon – 3:00 PM, and Sundays: 1:00 – 4:00 PM.

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Photo(s) of the Week: Hands On Press

This is Chelsea LaBate (a.k.a. Ten Cent Poetry) printing a series of short poems on a Vandercook printing press in the Fall Concentration taught by Beth Schaible (a.k.a. Quill and Arrow). Chelsea is a singer, songwriter, poet, and traveler, but she says, “letterpress is my new love.”

 

This is is the workshop’s studio assistant Celia Jailer (a.k.a. Afterschool Detective) making a pressure print onto a vellum press sheet. Pressure printing is an image-making technique in which a textured, flexible sheet is placed between the press sheet and the drum and then passed over a smooth, inked surface in the bed of the press. The image is transferred to the press sheet because it gets inked more heavily where there is pressure created by the textured sheet. It’s one of the many ways to work with these presses that Beth is covering in the workshop.

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Auction Weekend in Photos

The following post contains a photo slideshow that is best viewed on the Penland blog.

First sign it's auction weekend: a big white tent.
These are our incredible 2018 auction volunteers. This weekend couldn't happen without their enthusiastic help and support!
Mia Hall welcomes Penland's Lucy Morgan Leaders to the Director's Luncheon.
The buffet at the Director's Luncheon always includes lots of produce right from the Penland garden.
On Friday afternoon, students and friends of woodworker Doug Sigler gathered to honor him as Penland's 2018 Outstanding Artist Educator.
Friday's afternoon festivities centered around the new Northlight complex. The auction was the first event in the space!
Artwork for Friday's silent and live auctions hanging in the new photography studio.
Two levels of porches provided ample space for catching up with friends and enjoying a drink.
Meanwhile, as the evening got darker, the tent lit up for Friday's live auction.
Each auction table was decorated with a unique centerpiece by one of Penland's core fellows or studio coordinators. Each one was made around the theme of "vessels." This blown glass vase is by Corey Pemberton.
Light rain on Friday evening made for a colorful parade from Northlight to the tent.
Friday night lights under the tent!
This dough bowl by Joshua Kuensting kicked off Friday's live auction.
A photograph by recent resident artist Mercedes Jelinek up for bidding.
A volunteer shows off Julia Woodman's cocktail ladle.
The action under the tent by night.
Happy bidders at the end of a successful Friday evening. Thanks to all for their generous support!
Friday evening finished off with coffee, dessert, a preview of Saturday's pieces, and live music outside Northlight.
Starting Saturday morning off with Coffee at the Barns, a favorite auction tradition.
Penland's resident artists welcome auction guests into their studios to see their most recent work.
Ceramic artist Kurt Anderson made the 500+ unique mugs for this year's auction, each one decorated with his signature creatures in different colors.
Auction guests visiting the studio of residents Maggie and Tom Jaszczak.
In the jewelry studio of resident artist Laura Wood.
Meanwhile, up at Northlight, Penland's core fellows also had an open house to show off their work.
The Core Fellows Open House in the new gallery space at Northlight.
Work up for bidding at Saturday's auction was displayed in the new social hall at Northlight (this shot was taken from the 2nd floor balcony!).
Thanks to our wonderful contributing artists for the beautiful pieces they donate to Penland and to our excellent volunteers for staging everything!
Admiring this year's featured piece, "8 Bats 4 Seasons" by Tim Tate.
Saturday morning photobooth shenanigans, complete with big creatures by Kurt Anderson and a bat or two for good measure.
Back for more! Saturday's auction kicks off with auctioneer Mark Oliver.
Paddles up!
"The Challenger," a large reduction woodcut by Jun Lee up for auction.
Corey Pemberton served as this year's auction captain. He also had the best suit.
Volunteers let their bat wings fly for bidding on Tim Tate's signature piece, "8 Bats 4 Seasons."
Volunteers taking it all in from a sunny perch outside the tent.
What a weekend! Thanks to everyone who made it such a success, including this stellar group. We'll see you next August 9-10 for the 2019 auction.

 

As the days turn cooler and the sun sets ever earlier, we’ve been thinking back to one of our favorite weekends from the height of summer: the 33rd Annual Penland Benefit Auction!

This year’s auction was a great success thanks to the hundreds of attendees, contributing artists, volunteers, sponsors, and Penland staff who gave their time, talent, energy, and more. It was a chance to catch up with old friends and make new ones, enjoy remarkable art, honor some important people in our community, celebrate Penland’s new Northlight complex, and relax in this beautiful mountain setting. Scroll through the photos above to relive a bit of the fun!

Here are a few facts and figures from auction weekend:

  • Attendees: 649
  • Volunteers: 182
  • Outstanding Artist Educator: Woodworker and longtime Penland instructor Doug Sigler
  • Featured piece: 8 Bats 4 Seasons, a mesmerizing mirrored “portal” by Tim Tate
  • Fund-A-Need project: Renovating Morgan Hall to use as a communal house for Penland interns
  • Works up for bidding: 233
  • Total art sales: $340,622
  • Total revenue: $640,107
  • Net revenue generated for Penland programs: $462,294

Next year’s auction will be held August 9-10, 2019. Mark your calendars and join us then!

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Generosity, Community, Love

Last week, on our 2nd annual Penland Giving Day, this community blew us away. We asked all of you to help us generate support for our programs by making gifts for a 24-hour period on October 3, and you really delivered—not just with generous donations, but also with love and enthusiasm and photos and stories from your own times at Penland. Our theme for the day was #WeMakePenland, and you all showed us just how true that is. It’s all together, through the many diverse acts of sharing and attention and creativity, that this community remains so strong and vibrant. Thank you.

It was an exciting day by the numbers: in 24 hours you made 342 gifts to Penland (42 more than our goal of 300!) totaling $21,170. All of this money will go directly to supporting our programs, studios, scholarships, staff, and more. You also helped us share just what makes the Penland experience so valuable by posting over 200 stories to social media with the hashtag #WeMakePenland. The themes that emerged from these stories—a chance to explore and learn, an opportunity to develop skills and confidence, and an invitation to join a deep and connected community—were absolutely the most gratifying, inspiring, and affirming part of our Giving Day. We are so energized by the positive impact Penland has had on so many of you, and we are so grateful to be able to continue that impact thanks to your ongoing love and support.

Penland School kitchen staff
Penland’s beloved kitchen crew getting into the #WeMakePenland spirit on October 3.

Below, we share a handful of your #WeMakePenland stories. Get inspired here by browsing many more like them.

“Nearly 10 years ago I became a resident artist at the Penland School of Crafts and my life changed… But, really, @penlandschool started changing my life 10 years before that when I took my first class. Since then Penland has given me time and space, community, beloved instructors, dear friends, and incredible conversations, and left an indelible mark on my heart.”
Amy Tavern, student, instructor, friend, and former resident artist

“One of my favorite parts about the 2 weeks that I spent teaching at @penlandschool was the event at the end where all of the students shared their work. There was such energy, excitement, pride in that room—the ecstatic exhaustion of the work of making.”
Aaron Cohick, Penland letterpress instructor

“Some of my favorite @penlandschool moments include walking back to my housing after working late into the night, feeling the best kind of tired, and passing the other brightly lit studios still active with people obsessed, just like me.”
Aalia Mujtaba, Penland student and metalsmith

“In 2008 I moved to @penlandschool to be a core fellow and it changed the trajectory of my life for the long haul. Penland is the place I learned to slow down. To work hard. To ask questions. To notice details. The place I worked alongside some of the most incredible people I’ve ever met. The place I was given the gift of time, to delve into my work in new ways. The place I met some of my best friends and my partner.”
Beth Schaible, Penland instructor and former core student

@penlandschool is one of my favorite places on earth because its freedom, tenacity, inspiration, friendship, innovation, courage, and love. Every day spent there is a gift, and every trip there has changed me.”
Lauren Faulkenberry, Penland instructor and winter resident

three #WeMakePenland posts from the Penland instagram community

three #WeMakePenland posts from Penland friends on Instagram

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Photo of the Week: Painting Fabric

Tim Eads at Penland School

Textiles instructor Tim Eads painting on fabric using a scoop coater, which is screen-printing tool designed for spreading photo emulsion onto screens. “You have to be OK with it being terrible,” Tim said. “Then if you’re lucky it comes out looking cool.” The fabric hanging on the line was painted with a contraption made from tin cans attached to a stick. Tim’s eight-week workshop is about surface design on fabric. The emphasis is on screenprinting and monoprinting with a lot of experimentation.