Summer Session 2

Summer Session 2:
June 10 – 22, 2018

 

NEW REGISTRATION PROCESS

We have eliminated the early-registration lottery. We will begin accepting registration for 2018 summer workshops at 9:00 AM EST on Monday, January 8. Registration for full-pay students will be on a first-come, first-served basis and will continue until workshops are filled. Spaces are reserved in each workshop for scholarship students. Scholarship applications are due by February 17.

Workshops are open to serious students of all levels unless specified in course description; beginners welcome.

Clay Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Matt Kelleher
Thrown & Handbuilt Pitchers

We’ll find the potential of the pitcher as we investigate body, spout, and handle. Demonstrations will focus on thrown and handbuilt systems to encourage new compositional solutions. Each student will work in a variety of sizes, from creamers to large water pitchers. Techniques will include stacking forms, wrapping bisque molds, and cut-out spout patterns. We’ll use high-fire clay in atmospheric and reduction kilns. This workshop will not cover basic wheelthrowing, so beginning potters will focus on handbuilding. All levels. Code 02CA

Assistant professor at Alfred University (NY); other teaching: Shakerag (TN), Penland; residencies: Archie Bray Foundation (MT), Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park (Japan); exhibitions: Delaware Art Museum, Signature Gallery (Atlanta), AKAR Gallery (IA); former Penland resident artist.

mattkelleher.com

Matt Kelleher, "Pitcher," handbuilt red clay, soda-fired to cone 3, 14 x 7 x 6 inches
Matt Kelleher, "Pitcher," handbuilt red clay, soda-fired to cone 3, 14 x 7 x 6 inches
Clay Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Lauren Karle & Gail Kendall
Handbuilding Pottery: Form & Surface

Two instructors will demonstrate handbuilt functional pottery using different approaches to forming and decorating. Working with red earthenware, we’ll cover hard and soft slab construction, coil building, darting, bisque molds, slip transfers, wax resist, sgraffito, and decorating with underglazes and stains. Discussions will explore the nature and consequences of pattern and decoration, simple and complex form-making, approaches to color, and other topics. All levels; knowledge of clay vocabulary, materials, and techniques will be helpful. Code 02CB

Lauren: studio artist; teaching: Santa Fe Clay (NM), Kansas State University; NCECA emerging artist award, Bemis Center Betty Woodman prize (NE). Gail: Professor emeritus from University of Nebraska-Lincoln; NCECA lifetime achievement award.

laurenkarle.com
gailkendall.com

Lauren Karle, "Learning to Make Flour Tortillas with Aunt Blanca," earthenware, slip, mason stain wash, glaze, 4 x 7-1/2 inches
Lauren Karle, "Learning to Make Flour Tortillas with Aunt Blanca," earthenware, slip, mason stain wash, glaze, 4 x 7-1/2 inches
Gail Kendall, "Teapot," slipped terra cotta, underglaze, glaze, china paint, 9 x 8 x 6 inches
Gail Kendall, "Teapot," slipped terra cotta, underglaze, glaze, china paint, 9 x 8 x 6 inches
Drawing & Painting Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Noah Saterstrom
Oil Portraits: Chance & Likeness

The impulse to make images of faces is ancient and timeless. The struggle to get it right is likely just as timeless. Even finely portrayed features can lack the fluidity and spontaneity we recognize in living faces. In this portraiture workshop, we’ll work with many approaches to oil painting: from traditional techniques to exercises with glaze, scraping, blurring, and palette constraints. We’ll experiment with ways to bring accident, improvisation, and materiality into the process of oil portraiture even as we keep likeness and observation as our primary goals. All levels. Code 02D

Studio artist and founder of online art journal Trickhouse.org; teaching: Belmont University (TN), University of Arizona Poetry Center (AZ), Warren Wilson College (NC); exhibitions: Mississippi Museum of Art, Blue Spiral 1 (NC), Fischer Galleries (MS), Muzeumm (Los Angeles), Artbank (Scotland).

noahsaterstrom.com

Noah Saterstrom, "Walter Gropius," oil on canvas, 12 x 12 inches
Noah Saterstrom, "Walter Gropius," oil on canvas, 12 x 12 inches
Glass Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Amanda Patenaude & Megan Stelljes
Get It Together

This workshop will focus on having fun with glass while learning the language of hot sculpting and assembly. We’ll explore many magical hot shop techniques for color application, setting up your bubbles for success, and all the fun ways to stick parts together. Learn to incorporate a variety of maneuvers, work with a team, and make your whimsical or wacky dreams become reality. Pack your smile. Bright colors welcome. The only way to go is up! All levels. Code 02GA

Amanda: studio artist; residencies: STARworks (NC), S12 Galleria (Norway), Grand Central Art Center (CA). Megan: studio artist; teaching: UrbanGlass (NYC), Museum of Glass (WA); exhibitions: Sabbia Gallery (Australia), Museum of Neon Art (CA); representation: Vetri Gallery (WA).

amandapatenaude.com
meganstelljes.com

Amanda Patenaude, "Scavenger," hot-assembled blown glass, 17 x 12 x 12 inches
Amanda Patenaude, "Scavenger," hot-assembled blown glass, 17 x 12 x 12 inches
Megan Stelljes, "Tired of Lemonade," glass, 24 x 12 x 10 inches
Megan Stelljes, "Tired of Lemonade," glass, 24 x 12 x 10 inches
Glass Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Christopher Ahalt (CHA)
Sculpting Your Imagination

In this flameworking workshop students will learn to take a simple bubble of glass and form it into the shape of their desire—or at least something close. Using a blow hose and a few key tools, we’ll push and pull flameworked glass further than you thought possible. Much like painting, we’ll start with broad strokes and work our way to fine details. Bring your ideas and leave your expectations at home. Patience and persistence are essential. Learning from failure is what makes us grow. Students must have experience working with tubing at the torch and be able to attach handles. Code 02GB

Studio artist; teaching: Pittsburgh Glass Center, Salem Community College (NJ), Pilchuck (WA); gallery representation: Habatat Galleries (FL), Chesterfield Gallery (NYC), ECHT Gallery (Chicago); featured in American Craft.

chrisahalt.com

Christopher Ahalt, "Fed Up," borosilicate glass, copper, bronze, 5-1/2 x 5 x 18 inches
Christopher Ahalt, "Fed Up," borosilicate glass, copper, bronze, 5-1/2 x 5 x 18 inches
Iron Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Erica Moody
Fabricating & Forging Utensils

Combining jewelry and larger metalwork fabricating techniques, we’ll explore ways to create utensils in brass, copper, and steel. Demonstrations and experimentation will guide students in making their own eating and/or serving utensils which may be practical or purely sculptural. Techniques will include cold and hot forming (forging, sinking), cold and hot connections (riveting, silver brazing), finishing (angle grinding, hand filing, burnishing), and combining different materials (metals or found materials such as wood and bone). All levels. Code 02I

Studio artist and owner of Magma Metalworks (ME); teaching: Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design (MA), WoodenBoat School (ME), Wentworth Institute of Technology (MA), Center for Furniture Craftsmanship (ME); exhibitions: CRAFT Gallery (ME), Penland Gallery.

ericamoody.com

Erica Moody, "Serving Utensils," brass, each 7 inches long
Metals Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Mary Hallam Pearse
Jewelry Narratives: Collecting to Casting

Together we’ll tackle the conventions of jewelry while engaging with metal casting. Bring a small box of artifacts and ephemera—from found objects to photographs, clippings to stories. We’ll use these collections to generate ideas, forms, and meaning. We’ll cover centrifugal casting, wax working, hollow-form casting, plaster mold-making, and casting stones in place, plus all the basics from sawing to soldering. Although there will be finished pieces, the workshop will focus on developing narratives, exploring the meaning of jewelry and its relationship to the body, and the possibilities of casting metal. All levels. Code 02MA

Associate professor at University of Georgia; other teaching: University of Georgia Cortona Program (Italy), University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Anderson Ranch (CO), 92nd Street Y (NYC), Kent State University (OH); publications: Metalsmith, Ornament, 500 Rings and 500 Gemstone Jewels (both Lark Books).

Mary Hallam Pearse, "Chromeo," silver, aluminum, 23/4 x 21/4 x 1 inches
Metals Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Cappy Counard
Collection

The objects we surround ourselves with reveal a remarkable amount about our character and interests. We’ll begin by exploring a small collection of your treasured objects and references to reveal inspiration and inform new designs. Discussions, introspection, and interpretation will complement demonstrations of fabrication, hollow construction, forging, forming, and connections. We’ll use this technical vocabulary to open new possibilities while creating a collection of functional or nonfunctional objects that reflects your frame of reference. All levels; some experience with soldering will be helpful. Code 02MB

Professor at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowship; exhibitions: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Fuller Craft Museum (MA), East Carolina University (NC); publications: The Metalsmith’s Book of Boxes and Lockets (Hand Books Press), Art Jewelry Today 3 (Schiffer).

cappycounard.com

Cappy Counard, "The Human Cost, metal from one handgun, 12,942 wild lupine seeds 
(one for each person killed with a handgun in 2015)," copper, maple, 5 x 20 x 6 inches
Photo Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Sally Van Gorder
Narrative Photography

How do photographs convey meaning and communicate a story? This workshop will explore how narrative is created by determining content, controlling the camera, organizing the frame, and establishing a point of view. We’ll discuss how stories can be created with single or multiple images and learn about artists working in both fictional and documentary modes. We’ll experiment with form, composition, order, sequence, and pacing to discover organizing possibilities. We’ll cover basic camera techniques, shooting in available light, Adobe Bridge and Photoshop, and printing. Students can make new images or build on an existing body of work. All visual storytellers welcome. All levels. Code 02P

Teaching professor at North Carolina State University, Brightwork Fellow at Anchorlight (NC); other teaching: Virginia Commonwealth University (Qatar), Oregon College of Art and Craft, Pacific Northwest College of Art (OR); exhibitions: North Carolina Museum of Art, Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (NC), Contemporary Art Museum (NC).

Sally Van Gorder, "We Wait Softly," archival pigment print, 11 x 17 inches
Print & Letterpress Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Jennaway Pearson
Print Assemblage: Wood & Screen

This workshop will examine the possibilities and push the limitations of traditional print techniques. Working in screenprinting and woodcut, we’ll develop architectural prints, exploring surface and dimensional printing. Using a combination of water- and oil-based inks, we’ll build and develop relationships with each layer. We’ll cover basic techniques in both screenprinting and woodcut along with a variety of surface techniques. Students can expect to finish two small editions, but the emphasis of this workshop is process and experimentation. All levels. Code 02X

Studio artist; teaching: American University (DC), George Washington University (DC); residencies: Sarvisberry Studios (VA), Handprint Workshop International (VA); recent exhibition: “Wonder Woman” at National Museum for Women in the Arts (DC); collections: Library of Congress (DC), Corcoran Gallery of Art (DC), National Museum of Women in the Arts.

jennawaypearson.com

Jennaway Pearson, "J. Scott," screenprint, woodcut, 8 x 10 inches
Print & Letterpress Summer Session Two
June 10–22
Aaron Cohick
Text Without Type

In this workshop we’ll use letterpress and relief printmaking techniques to explore the visual, material, conceptual, narrative, and poetic possibilities of text. We’ll focus on low-tech processes that don’t involve traditional typesetting and can be adapted for use outside of a letterpress studio: linoleum/paper relief, collagraph, stencil printing, pressure printing, pochoir, monoprinting, and collage. We’ll also cover some simple bookbinding. Each student will produce a set of print samples, as well as an artist’s book or print series. All levels. Code 02L

Studio artist and printer/publisher at NewLights Press (CO) and The Press at Colorado College; teaching: Arrowmont (TN), Naropa University (CO), Colorado College; Emerging Educator Award from the College Book Art Association; collections: Library of Congress (DC), British Library, Yale University (CT), Tate Britain, National Library of Australia.

newlightspress.com

Aaron Cohick, "Alphabet One: A Submanifesto of the NewLights Press," artist’s book, woven collagraph on newsprint, 61/2 x 11-1/4 inches
Textiles Summer Session Two
June 10-22
Ruth Miller
Embroidered Portraiture

This workshop will teach a process for creating realistic portraits with hand-stitched embroidery. Accurate observation will replace preconceived notions of reality and form the basis for shaded and colored-pencil reference drawings. We’ll use grids to transfer line drawings onto stretched fabric for under-images made with wool yarns. We’ll cover stitching placement and yarn combinations that will create 2d forms with complex color fields. Students may begin a full portrait or complete several small studies; the workshop will cover all parts of the process. A willingness to strive for accuracy is necessary but a prior ability to achieve it is not. All levels. Code 02TA

Studio artist; teaching: Tougaloo College (MS), Our Children’s Foundation (NYC); NYC Urban Artist Initiative grant, Mississippi Arts Commission fellowship; exhibitions: solo at Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art (MS).

ruthmillerembroidery.com

Ruth Miller, "Teacup Fishing" (detail), wool, fabric
Textiles Summer Session Two
June 10-22
Wendy Weiss
Pattern & Motif: Warp Ikat with Natural Dyes

We’ll prepare cotton warps to create patterns and singular motifs using Indian-type ikat resist and natural dye on warp and weft yarn. Beginning to advanced weavers will learn all the steps of setting up the loom from back to front with an ikat warp. Beginning weavers will explore basic weaving with their original warps, while intermediate and advanced students will design more intricate resist patterns and work with weave structure design. Students will complete at least two warp ikat weavings in hues of red, yellow, and purple. All levels. Code 02TB

Professor emeritus at University of Nebraska-Lincoln; other teaching: Peters Valley (NJ), MidAtlantic Fiber Association (PA), Handweavers Guild of America (WI); two Fulbright Nehru Scholar awards; exhibitions: Surface Design Association (Santa Fe), 15th International Triennial of Tapestry (Poland).

wendyweiss.org

Wendy Weiss, "Resist," cotton, natural dyes, 22 x 40 inches
Wood Summer Session Two
June 10-22
Kimberly Winkle
Decked Out Furniture: Color, Mark & Form

Using conventional furniture-making techniques, students will build boxes and tables that will be enrobed with paint, marks, and texture to imbue them with personality and charm. We’ll start with quick and fun ways of building and shaping boxes as we learn the safe and proper use of equipment and machinery. Then we’ll design and build small tables using traditional joinery. Along the way we’ll cover a plethora of surface design treatments for wood, which students will use to bring life and attitude to their box and table. All levels. Code 02W

Associate professor at Tennessee Technological University; teaching: Haystack (ME), Anderson Ranch (CO), Arrowmont (TN), Center for Furniture Craftsmanship (ME); John D. Mineck fellowship, State of Tennessee artist fellowship; residencies: Purchase College (NY), Center for Art in Wood (Philadelphia), Vermont Studio Center, Haystack Open Studio Residency (ME).

kimberlywinkle.com

Kimberly Winkle, "Odd Man Out Table," polychrome poplar and mahogany, 22 x 58 x 24 inches