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Focus on: Jessica Calderwood

The Penland Gallery and Visitors Center proudly presents the second Focus exhibition of the season, a new body of  enameled jewelry, sculpture, and mixed-media paintings by Jessica Calderwood. Now on view in the Focus Gallery, the show runs through Sunday, June 16th.

 

"Entangled (Magnolia Grandiflora)," enamel on copper, ceramic decals, china paint, sterling silver, 10 x 10 x 2 inches
“Entangled (Magnolia Grandiflora),” enamel on copper, ceramic decals, china paint, sterling silver, 10 x 10 x 2 inches

 

“My most recent series combines flower/botanical forms with fragments of the human body in order to address the narrative of human life cycles: change, growth, metamorphosis, aging, loss. The choice to use flower and plant forms is multi-layered. Flowers have been used throughout history as symbols of the feminine. It can be found in mythology, literature, folklore and visual art. In addition, Western culture has an intricate system of flower symbolism that has been a way for humans to express and communicate complex emotions.

 

“Garden Variety”, brooch: enamel, copper, ceramic decals, china paint, sterling silver, glass beads, stainless steel
“Garden Variety”, brooch: enamel, copper, ceramic decals, china paint, sterling silver, glass beads, stainless steel

 

“I created these work to be intentionally humorous and ironic. These human/plant hybrids are large, voluptuous, headless, and sometimes armless. They are intended to portray a spectrum of concepts relating to gender and identity. The Flower People are at once, powerful and powerless, beautiful and absurd, inflated, and amputated.” – Jessica Calderwood

 

“Overgrown”, mixed-media collage: magazine paper, enamel, copper, ceramic decals, thread, adhesive, glass beads, gouache, graphite on paper, 18 x 12 inches
“Overgrown”, mixed-media collage: magazine paper, enamel, copper, ceramic decals, thread, adhesive, glass beads, gouache, graphite on paper, 18 x 12 inches

 

Jessica Calderwood is an image-maker and sculptor who works primarily in the mediums of metal and enamel, using a combination of traditional and industrial metalworking processes  to make statements about contemporary life. Her works are imbued with personal stories and vibrant color. She received her BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art and her MFA from Arizona State University, with an emphasis in metalworking. Her work has been exhibited throughout the U.S. and internationally. She has participated in artist residencies with the John Michael Kohler Arts/Industry Program and the Mesa Arts Center. Her work has also been published in Metalsmith Magazine, American Craft, NICHE, Ornament, the Lark 500 series, and The Art of Enameling. She has been an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh since 2008. Most recently, Calderwood is a recipient of a Wisconsin Arts Board Fellowship.

 

“So Square”, mixed-media sculpture: ceramic, paint, enamel, copper, fiberglass, silk flowers, 4 x 2.5 x 2.5 feet
“So Square”, mixed-media sculpture: ceramic, paint, enamel, copper, fiberglass, silk flowers, 4 x 2.5 x 2.5 feet

 

Click here to visit Jessica’s website, where you can see more of her work.
Click here to visit the Penland Gallery website.
Penland’s Focus Gallery is a space primarily dedicated to single-artist exhibitions. Focusing on individual artists over the course of the year, it presents a larger selection of their work to gallery visitors and patrons.
Click here for more information about the Focus Gallery.

 

 

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Focus on: Tina Mullen

The Penland Gallery and Visitors Center presents its first Focus exhibition of the year, a new body of  work in drawing and painting by Tina Mullen. This show is on view in the Focus Gallery from Friday, March 22 through Sunday, April 28th, with an opening reception Friday, March 22, from 4:30 – 6pm.

 

"Carolina Wren," watercolor and graphite on nautical chart, 6 x 6 in.
“Crosshairs,” watercolor and graphite on nautical chart, 14 x 11 in.

 

“I find that I use it often – the phrase “out of the blue” – to describe events, ideas, and the way things strike me.  I wonder if I use it more than others, or if I’m just less prepared than others and things catch me off guard.  Regardless, I enjoy contemplating the notion that things happen unexpectedly. That some of the best things in life are unplanned, unscheduled, and come to us by chance – out of the blue.  The real beauty for me is what becomes of us because of them.

In my work, “out of the blue” represents migration, journey and the stories that happen along the way. Many of the drawings are done on maps. Maps of places traveled, Maps given to me by friends and Maps that come with their own history. Represented are maps of some of the places that I love – Florida, North Carolina, and Oregon.


Other points of departure for my drawings might be a piece of paper found in an old book that contains the owners’ doodles or handwriting. Those marks, the age of the paper, slight rips or tears bear witness to a past unknown to me.  I enjoy excavating through those marks, setting off on a new path – a new visual adventure.

Here’s to the journey.” – Tina Mullen

 

"Small Precarious Fate," watercolor, pastel, and colored pencil on vintage paper, 18 x 12 in.
“Small Precarious Fate,” watercolor, pastel, and colored pencil on vintage paper, 18 x 12 in.

 

Tina Mullen is an artist who lives in Gainesville, Florida. She is also the director of Shands Arts in Medicine – a program that brings the arts to patients and families struggling with serious illness.

“I have painted and drawn pictures my entire life. I believe that the arts are a vehicle for transformation and personal expression, and my passion is to help others bring art into their lives in meaningful ways.”

Tina has been a drawing instructor at Santa Fe Community College and the University of Florida, as well as Interim Director of the University Galleries at UF. Tina is also a working artist who has exhibited her work throughout the United States.  She has received numerous awards including the Individual Artist Fellowship from the Florida Department of Cultural Affairs. She has been a visiting artist at Penland, the Ringling School of Art in Sarasota, Florida and the Ucross Foundation in Wyoming.

Tina has a BA from Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, and has an MFA from the University of Florida.

 

Tina Mullen
Tina Mullen

 

Click here to visit Tina’s website, where you can see more of her work.

Click here to visit the Penland Gallery website.

Penland’s Focus Gallery is a space primarily dedicated to single-artist exhibitions. Focusing on individual artists over the course of the year, it presents a larger selection of their work to gallery visitors and patrons.

Click here for more information about the Focus Gallery.

 

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Focus on: Scarves

The Penland Gallery and Visitors Center is pleased to present its eighth and final Focus exhibition of 2012, a collection of special hand-made scarves by Penland affiliated artists. This collection of over 50 scarves by ten uniquely talented textile artists includes a diverse range of techniques and fibers. Woven shibori, tied shibori, machine and hand felting, natural dyes, resist and vat dye techniques, machine and hand embroidery, machine knitting, hand-woven and specialty mill-woven cloth… and skill, skill, and more skill are combined to produce this very inviting selection of textiles.

The show is on view in the Focus Gallery from Friday, November 2nd through Sunday, November 25th.

 

Zee Boudreaux, Dot Shawl, hand tied shibori (India), natural dyes, 100% silk

 

 

Raissa Bump, Felted Knit Hat/Scarf, 100% merino wool

“Enriched by my curiosity in the parallel, yet sometimes blurry line between jewelry and apparel, my work is fueled by a direct response to contrasting materials that when together, create complementary relationships. Traditional to jewelry, gold and silver are limited in the palate, fairly rigid and tend to hold their shape. Traditional to apparel, fibers such as silk can be dyed infinite colors, they are soft and tend to conform. Next to each other the contrast is heightened; it is bolder, more lively. Sheet metal seems incredibly stiff and strong. Silk appears light, delicate and vivid. Twisted thin wire is amazingly similar to the plied silk it is next to, yet functions so differently. Stone or glass beads unite, being hard like metal yet sharing color with fiber. Grids, both manufactured and organic are used in many variations, creating a surface that allows for different applications of the same materials – making evident qualities innate to them. These structures and supports are integral, sometimes they are left to appear as a visible design element, other times they disappear and only the handiwork – stitching, weaving, or knotting – can be seen. These pieces are layered, made to be worn, with the human desire to adorn at the core of their creation.” – Raissa Bump

 

Catharine Ellis, Lace Scarf, 100% cotton, hand gathered and hand dyed with natural plant dyes: lac, sumac leaves, mordanted with alum, iron, and titanium, woven at The Oriole Mill

“I construct fabrics by weaving threads on a loom. My original training was in traditional woven techniques, which led me to weave functional fabrics in natural fibers for many years. For the last number of years my career has been defined by the discovery and exploration of the woven shibori process. Woven shibori transforms a traditional stitched resist into one that conjoins with a woven application, providing a new freedom in fabric design. Woven shibori has challenged all that I know about weaving and has led me to investigate new materials, resists, dyes and finishing processes.” – Catharine Ellis

 

Yvonne Engler, Autumn Shawl, 50% cotton, 50% rayon, handwoven in opposing twill block

 

Carmen Grier, Stitched Scarf, multi-resist dyed and stitched wool

“The natural world is rich with eccentric surfaces and lush, layered hues. My goal is to express or reflect this deep beauty in my textiles. By manipulating fabric with dyes, shibori, screen-printing, drawing and piecing techniques, I coax the cloth into one–of-a-kind, handmade compositions – small poems that seek to represent the ephemeral and suggest the eternal.” – Carmen Grier

 

Ana Lisa Hedstrom, Black Cloque Scarf with Red Patches, shibori-dyed silk with needle-punched patches

“My work departs from traditional Japanese techniques and a stereotypical Japanese aesthetic…but I hope to retain some of the invention and skill found in Japanese indigo dyed Shibori. In the working “dialogue” of the studio, I incorporate western fabrics, tools, and dye techniques with traditional Shibori concepts. I have found parallels in forgotten western techniques of smocking, shirring, and ruching. Most recently I have explored digital printing based on scanned scraps of my hand dyed Shibori.” – Ana Lisa Hedstrom

 

Lisa Klakulak, ‘Untitled’ Body Textile, merino wool fleece, silk fabrics, cotton sewing thread; wet-felted, partial felt applique, felt-fused fabric, naturally dyed with Osage Orange wood and indigo extract, free motion machine-embroidered surface embossing

“Employed throughout antiquity for its protective qualities, felt is an ideal material to make visual commentary on our human vulnerability and the ways we seek physical security and mental defense. Lisa Klakulak incorporates both objects and images of natural materials as well as reclaimed human-made products that offer a sense of comfort and security in her work. Inspired by humanity’s age-old relationship with the community and time involved fiber processes, her primary use of fiber and natural dyes represents a fight for the threatened values of community responsibility, patience, physical activity, and an intimate relationship with our natural world. Lisa instructs workshops nationally as well as pursuing opportunities to work with children to integrate fiber art into the visual art curriculum and to raise cultural awareness and appreciation inspired by her international travels.” – Lisa Klakulak

Noellynn Pepos, Felted Scarf, merino wool, alpaca, hand-painted silk

 

“My work in functional fiber arts satisfies my need to contribute to and enhance the simple pleasures in daily life-warmth, comfort, texture and color….enlivening the senses. My raw materials are fine wool and silk and my process the ancient technique of felting practiced in a contemporary light. Felting in theory is simple – wool’s microscopic scales curl during the process of applying heat, pressure and moisture thus creating an interlocking fabric. Complex is my approach to composition-multiple layers blending rich tones and intricate patterns are felted then hand blocked and sculpted to achieve a harmony of color and form.” – Noellynn Peopos

 

Amy Putansu, Double Layer Silk Chiffon Scarf

 

Janet Taylor, Red and Purple Angles Scarf, silk chiffon, vat dye discharge

You can click here to visit the Focus Gallery on our website, where you can see more (yes, more) amazing scarves by these artists.

Penland’s Focus Gallery is a space primarily dedicated to single-artist exhibitions. Focusing on individual artists over the course of the year, it presents a larger selection of their work to gallery visitors and patrons.

You can click here to visit the Penland Gallery website.

 

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Focus on: Jerilyn Virden

The Penland Gallery and Visitors Center presents its seventh Focus exhibition of the year, a new body of  work in ceramics by Jerilyn Virden. This show is on view in the Focus Gallery from Friday, October 5th through Sunday, October 28th.

Jerilyn Virden vase
“Black Pillow Vase,” hand-built earthenware

“Using the vernacular of the vessel and working within a narrow range of forms, I use the power of subtlety to create intimate spaces. Each form employs a language that reveals its intentions. My interest lies in the slight shifts within the arc of a bowl that determine the nature of the containment.

Jerilyn Virden cheese tray
“Small Cheese Tray with Cloche and Bowl,” hand-built earthenware, glass

“Looking to primitive objects that have a contemporary relevance, I pare down forms and exaggerate isolated elements accentuating their sense of generosity and strength. Hollow construction allows for exaggeration of features, contributing a visual weight that floats above the table. A bowl that curls back on itself may seem shy and protective, while the force of a gentle upward turn of its lip invites a more active investigation of the object.

Jerilyn Virden servers
“Nesting Hollow Servers,” hand-built earthenware

“Formed through repeated scraping and pinching, building up and finally excavating the appropriate curve, each piece retains the history of its making. Layers of glaze soften these individual marks, bringing more clarity to the form. The surface becomes a way to manipulate scale, moving from intimacy to expansion, in the way one understands a landscape by knowing both the small stone at one’s feet and the bulk of the mountain far away.”

Jerilyn Virden nesting bowls
“Square Nesting Bowls,” hand-built earthenware

Jerilyn Virden is a studio artist who lives in the village of Greensboro, Vermont. She creates hollow ceramic sculptural forms as well as utilitarian pottery. Before relocating to the Northeast Kingdom, she was a studio artist in Mitchell County, North Carolina for 10 years. She was a resident artist at Penland School of Crafts from 2001-2004, and received a North Carolina Arts Fellowship Grant in 2006. Jerilyn earned her MFA from Southern Methodist University in 2001. Before attending graduate school she completed a two-year assistantship at the studio of Silvie Granatelli, in Floyd, Virginia. Her work has been exhibited at the Mint Museum of Craft and Design and she has work in the permanent collection of the Asheville Art Museum and NCECA.

Click here to visit Jerilyn’s website, where you can see more of her work.

Click here to visit the Penland Gallery website.

Penland’s Focus Gallery is a space primarily dedicated to single-artist exhibitions. Focusing on individual artists over the course of the year, it presents a larger selection of their work to gallery visitors and patrons.

Click here for more information about the Focus Gallery.

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Focus on: Charity Hall

The Penland Gallery and Visitors Center is pleased to present its sixth Focus exhibition of the year, Tangere, a new suite of  wearable artworks by Tucson, Arizona-based artist Charity Hall. This show is open to the public in the Focus Gallery from Friday, August 31st through Sunday, September 30th.

 

“Lumenorbis” brooch; bronze, brass, copper, enamel

Lumenorbis, literally meaning ‘light of the world,’ examines the complex microcosm of a tiny foreign organism.  Thousands of minute creatures remain elusive, completely unknown to science. They survive in specialized niches within the depths of deep sea vents, crevasses, or even in plain slight and will flourish or perish, irrespective of our awareness. The enamel in this piece glows in the dark.”

 

“Metallodesmus Trigintaduopes” ring; bronze, copper, brass

“A millipede crawling upon your hand feels halfway between barely noticeable and lightly tickling. You can feel the overall sensation of movement, but not the individual legs so delicately fragile on your callused hand. But if you existed on the same scale as a millipede and had it walking upon you, I imagine it would feel quite differently; its legs formidable, with the tips digging as it marches doggedly along.”

 

“Virilis” brooch; silver, copper, brass, pink sapphires

“In this body of work, I am using copper, brass, bronze, and silver along with a variety of tiny semi-precious gemstones.  The appendage-like protrusions are made individually out of brass wire, and each ‘segment’ is cut with a jeweler’s saw.  Some of the pieces glow in the dark, which is accomplished by a special firing process of fusing glow powder with enamel. This exploratory work examines tactility from the perspective of minute organisms, from radiolarians to millipedes. Tiny creatures experience and palpably digest their environment using an arsenal of appendages: antennae, flagella, legs, and tentacles. The dogged march of a millipede, the rhythmic undulation of feeding tentacles, and the quivering antennae of a lacewing each relay segments of information mechanistically necessary for survival. Although I’ve never studied entomology, I have always been an avid bug enthusiast and am fascinated by the intricate textural and mechanical details of invertebrates.  I married an entomologist, and we spend time in the field collecting millipedes in California and in the Appalachians.  We recently began keeping live millipedes, and it is fascinating to watch their rhythmic movements as they walk about.”

Charity Hall is a metalsmith and enamelist with a background in biology. She has a B.A. in  botany and conservation biology from Colorado College, where she also took jewelry classes with Dindy Reich. After college, she worked as a biological surveyor and as a botanist for the U.S. Forest Service before pursuing graduate studies in Quaternary Sciences (paleobotany). After taking a ring-making workshop at Penland, where she met many working artists, Charity knew she wanted to become a metalsmith. She left her graduate program in the sciences to pursue an M.F.A., which she received from East Carolina University in 2008.

You can click here to visit Charity’s website, where you can see more of her work.

You can click here to visit the Penland Gallery website.

Penland’s Focus Gallery is a space primarily dedicated to single-artist exhibitions. Focusing on individual artists over the course of the year, it presents a larger selection of their work to gallery visitors and patrons.

You can click here for more information about Focus Gallery artists.

 

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Focus On: Andrew Hayes

Andrew Hayes

 

The Penland Gallery and Visitors Center presents the year’s fifth Focus exhibition, Diction, a suite of new sculptures in steel and book pages by Asheville, NC, artist and former Penland core fellow Andrew Hayes. This show is open to the public in the Focus Gallery from Friday, August 3rd through Sunday, August 26th.

 

Sculptures by Andrew Hayes
(L to R) Andrew Hayes, Divaricate, steel, book pages, bronze, gold leaf, brass, 9 x 14 x 5.5 in.; Haul, bronze, book pages, steel, 6 x 15 x 2 in.

 

“The book is a seductive object to hold and smell and run your fingers through. I am drawn to books for many reasons; however, the content of the book does not enter my work. The pages allow me to achieve a form, surface, and texture that are appealing to me. The book as an object is full of fact and story. I take my sensory appreciation for the book as a material and employ the use of metal to create a new form, and hopefully a new story.

“During the past three years since the Core Fellowship, I have been busy. Directly after leaving Penland, I started working for Hoss Haley in Asheville, North Carolina. This experience has become something I can only sum up as an invaluable education and mentorship. While working for Hoss I have started to understand metalworking, and the subtle nuances that I used to fight have become tools for forming the material. Also during this time, I have taken on the chore of rebuilding a house in Asheville, which has taken the place of my studio practice for the last two years. This is the first body of work I’ve made in what seems like a long time, at least more than a year. I was trying to make the work I’ve been thinking of while working on the house. These are some new shapes and some more recognizable forms that I’ve worked with in the past. At the beginning of making this show I was very nervous about my ability to produce for myself again, but I tried to push forms that intrigue me and discover how to breathe new direction into this work.”

 

Sculptures by Andrew Hayes
(L to R) Andrew Hayes, Swell, steel and book pages, 6 x 9 x 5 in.; Lean, steel and book pages, 7 x 9 x 4 in.

 

Andrew Hayes grew up in Tucson, Arizona and studied sculpture at Northern Arizona University. The desert landscape inspired much of his early sculptural work and allowed him to cultivate his style in fabricated steel. After leaving school, Andrew worked in the industrial welding trade. While living in Portland, Oregon, bouncing between welding jobs and creating his own work he was invited to the EMMA collaboration. This one-week experience was liberating for Andrew and he was encouraged by his fellow collaborators to apply to the Core Fellowship at Penland School of Crafts. During his time as a Core Fellow, Andrew was able to explore a variety of materials and technique. Surprisingly, the book became a big part of this exploration. In this work he faces the challenge of marrying the rigid qualities of metal with the delicacy of the book page.

Click here to visit the Penland Gallery website.
Penland’s Focus Gallery is a space primarily dedicated to single-artist exhibitions. Focusing on individual artists over the course of the year, it will present a larger selection of their work to gallery visitors and patrons.

Click here for more information about Focus Gallery artists.

 

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Focus on: Sarah Loertscher

The Penland Gallery and Visitors Center is pleased to present its fourth Focus exhibition of the season, a suite of jewelry and prints by Seattle-based artist and former Penland core fellow Sarah Loertscher. This show is on view in the Focus Gallery from Friday, July 6th through Sunday, July 29th.

Sarah Loertscher, flanked by her assistants.

Sarah Loertscher’s work is strongly influenced by minerals and crystalline structures. She has always been fascinated by minerals and how they are identified. One of the ways that minerals are identified is with the use of a “streak plate,” which is an unglazed porcelain square. A mineral is rubbed against these plates and the roughness of the porcelain causes a streak of color to be left behind.  Whatever color the mineral “streaks” helps identify the mineral itself.

In this exhibit Sarah combines her interests in identifying minerals and jewelry. She creates her own rendition of the streak plate using silverpoint- a technique of drawing with silver wire. The prints are then paired with a piece of jewelry.

Jewelry in process…

“I grew up in Indiana, amidst open fields of corn and sweeping skies. As children, my brother and I spent copious amounts of time outside exploring our surroundings, and I would spend hours inching up our gravel driveway, meticulously looking for glittery “fool’s gold” that was sparsely scattered through the stones. This fascination with both intense process (our driveway was huge! and I had a system to leave no stone unturned) and sparkling facets would reemerge later in my both my jewelry and two-dimensional work.

Soldering…

From 1999-2003 I studied metalsmithing at Ball State University with Patricia Nelson, and in 2003 I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts with an emphasis in metalsmithing. After graduation, I apprenticed under a retail bench jeweler, and then applied for & received a Core Fellowship at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina. The Core Fellowship, a two-year work-study program, introduced me to printmaking and drawing, which continues to exert a strong influence on my graphic, often line-based work. In 2006 I moved to Seattle, where I am currently teaching and working out of my studio in West Seattle.

Filing…

My work reflects both the landscape I grew up in and my interest in the underlying structure of natural objects. Growing up in Indiana, with its expansive skies and industrial structures, nurtured my appreciation for clean, minimal forms. The Midwest’s vast fields and skies served as a visual canvas to power lines, granaries, and silos- structures wrought from pure function. These immense objects impressed upon me the feeling that structure itself is beauty, and the bare bones of a form are the often the beautiful parts.

My work is an exploration of these structural forms – building up a single line or shape into a dense mass, or distilling forms into their skeletal supports. All of my work revolves around crystalline growth: I am fascinated with the way that something made purely of hard edges and angles can grow as organically as a flower. I mimic crystalline formations in my jewelry, constructing simple wire forms into hard-edged, slightly chaotic structures.”

A finished necklace.

Click here to visit Sarah Loertscher’s website, where you can see more of her work.

Click here to visit the Penland Gallery website.
Penland’s Focus Gallery is a space primarily dedicated to single-artist exhibitions. Focusing on individual artists over the course of the year, it will present a larger selection of their work to gallery visitors and patrons.

Click here for more information about Focus Gallery artists.