Archive | November, 2013

Photo(s) of the Week: Studio Reading

books in Robin Johnston's studio at Penland

This intriguing stack of books was in the studio of weaver and Penland resident artist Robin Johnston. (If you would like to take a weaving workshop with a person who keeps books like this in her studio, you can do that.)

 

books in Michael Kline's studio

Here’s what our neighbor Michael Kline, a potter and a former Penland resident artist, has in his studio.

 

 

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Form Focus with David Eichelberger

 

The concept embodied in a jar, a bowl, or any vessel for containment is, at its root, about generating a special place for something specific. The immediate connection someone has with a container regards its use. When we conjure an idea about using a container, we are practicing a basic ordering of our environment.  By selecting a particular something to live inside that place, we act in harmony with our desire, as human beings, to recognize patterns and order in the world.

Drawn objects on my work act on the same principle as their parent vessels–a desire for order–but through a different avenue. Just as we are quick to create uses for a container, we are quick to create narratives when given a set of props. Entire, elaborate stories blossom nearly instantly in our minds from the simplest of starts. I am interested in acknowledging Order by offering a setting for it to occur in a vessel, and by recognizing it in our need for Story, developed through imagery.David Eichelberger

 

 

David Eichelberger, platter: bird and kites, earthenware, sgraffito, 3 x 19 x 12 inches

David Eichelberger, platter: bird
and kites, earthenware, sgraffito,
3 x 19 x 12 inches

David Eichelberger
Form Focus
In the clay studio
In this workshop we’ll slow down and approach handbuilding in a way that will make every pinch count. Ideas will start with functional forms and grow from there. Techniques will include slab, coil, and pinching methods, bisque and plaster molds, and a variety of surfaces and finishes such as terra sigillata, sgraffito, and laser print decals. We’ll use earthenware clay and explore various firing possibilities. With the help of visiting artists and discussions, this studio immersion will be about ideas and how to realize them in clay. All levels, although some experience with wheelthrowing or handbuilding will be helpful.

In addition to simple laser-printed decals, students in David’s workshop will create, as a class, a silk-screened series of low-fire china paint decals in coordination with resources in Penland’s printmaking studio.

Students will also observe and pitch in, if they choose, on a slipcasting project generating molds and mugs led by David Eichelberger’s wife, artist Elisa Di Feo–but the main focus of Form Focus will be on handbuilding.

 

To find out more and register for this workshop click here.
Spring scholarship deadline is November 29.

Please note: applications need to be at Penland by this date to be considered for scholarship. Overnight service may not deliver to Penland’s campus on time, please plan accordingly.

 

 

David Eichelberger is a resident artist at Penland School of Crafts. He has taught workshops at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the Appalachian Center for Craft (TN) in addition to Penland. He has been a resident at Energy Xchange (NC) and the Appalachian Center for Craft. His exhibitions include Santa Fe Clay, Ferrin Gallery (MA), The Clay Studio (Philadelphia) and AKAR Design Gallery (IA), among others.

For the third time recently, David listened to the BBC program A History of the World in 100 Objects, and it continues to amaze him to think of how rich objects can be with information.

 

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Steve Tengelsen

steven tengelsen at Penland

Steve Tengelsen in the Penland wood studio with a piece he made for the Penland auction in 2007.

Steve Tengelsen, who had a house and studio near Penland for a time and took care of the school’s wood shop as studio coordinator for several years, died last week of metastasized melanoma. Steve was a soft-spoken man who smiled a lot and favored Hawaiian shirts. He was an excellent cabinet maker and furniture builder.

Steve had an M.A. from San Diego State and had been a resident at Anderson Ranch in Colorado and the Appalachian Craft Center in Tennessee. After he left Penland, he settled in Asheville where he lived, he said, “in a cool old home in a historic neighborhood with the lovely Helen and our two cats, Mica and Mister White Purr.” Steve taught workshops regularly at the John C. Campbell Folk School, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Peters Valley Craft School, and other venues.

He had some warning that the end was near and spent his last few months in the company of friends and his long-time partner, Helen Purdum. In August, he sent a note to his friends with a cheerful update on his rather grim medical situation. He signed off with this advice: Get physical. Exercise. Wear a hat. Eat ice cream. Love, Steve

 

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Contemporary Thermodynamic Design with Mike Rossi

 

“I think blacksmithing is sometimes seen as something old or backward looking. It’s a handworking process, it requires earplugs, and there’s no app for it.

 

But there is a sensitivity to it, and a versatility to the process of forging that’s unavailable any other way. It allows me to be responsive to architecture and space in all my work, and to create any physical shape in metal.

 

In a world of mass manufacturing, forged metal objects represent something rarefied and meaningful.”
–Mike Rossi 

 

Mike Rossi, Ellipsis in blue, forged and inflated steel, 2013.

Mike Rossi, Ellipsis in blue, forged and inflated steel, 2013.

 

Mike Rossi
Contemporary Thermodynamic Design
In the iron studio
This workshop will use blacksmithing techniques to create meaningful contemporary sculpture and useful objects. We’ll start with introductory exercises and then move into self-directed projects. The workshop will be based in hot forging and forming, including hand- and power-hammer forging of steel and bronze, sheet metal forming, inflation, joinery, and simple toolmaking. We’ll also cover finishing techniques, including bringing color to surface. Throughout, we’ll consider the underlying content of our work and investigate the place of blacksmithing in contemporary life. We’ll work hard, have fun, and create many new objects. All levels.*

 

To find out more and register for this workshop click here.
Spring scholarship deadline is November 29. Please note: applications need to be at Penland by this date to be considered for scholarship. Overnight service may not deliver to Penland’s campus on time, please plan accordingly.

 

*Mike Rossi notes that the course of his eight-week workshop will be subject to change based on the interest of his students. Basic toolmaking will be covered, but Rossi adds this disclaimer:

 

“we won’t be making any swords during this class!”

 

 

Mike Rossi has taught at Penland, Ox-Bow and Kalamazoo College. His work has been exhibited at Torpedo Factory (VA),the National Ornamental Metals Museum (TN), and  Houston Center for Contemporary Art (TX), among others. He was participant in FERRO 2005 (Germany). He tries to read one book a week, and has been influenced by the writings of Gene Wolfe, Jack Vance, Jorge Borges, and Dave Hickey–and, more recently, Samuel Delaney and Mervyn Peake. Over the last two years, he’s been blown away by the animated films of Hayao Miyazaki. Oh yes, and his big three artists right now are Olafur Eliasson, Martin Puryear, and Giorgio de Chirico.

 

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0 to 60 in Manhattan

Left: Richard Hughes, Untitled (Triptick), 2009, cast polyurethane, 12⁄1 2 × 14 × 2⁄1 2 inches, courtesy of the artist, Anton Kern Gallery, NY, and Hall Collection. © 2009 Richard Hughes, Anton Kern Gallery, N.Y., and Hall Collection; Photo: Thomas Müller. Right: Dan Estabrook, The Kiss, 2011, unique gum bichromate print with watercolor, 18 x 15 inches, collection of Allen G. Thomas, Jr., Wilson, N.C. © Dan Estabrook. Reproduction courtesy of Daniel Cooney Fine Art, New York.

Left: Richard Hughes, Untitled (Triptick), 2009, cast polyurethane, 12⁄1 2 × 14 × 2⁄1 2 inches, courtesy of the artist, Anton Kern Gallery, NY, and Hall Collection. © 2009 Richard Hughes, Anton Kern Gallery, N.Y., and Hall Collection; Photo: Thomas Müller. Right: Dan Estabrook, The Kiss, 2011, unique gum bichromate print with watercolor, 18 x 15 inches, collection of Allen G. Thomas, Jr., Wilson, N.C. © Dan Estabrook. Reproduction courtesy of Daniel Cooney Fine Art, New York.

 

0 to 60: The Experience of Time through Contemporary Art will open on November 21 at Pratt Manhattan Gallery in New York City. The exhibition, co-organized by the North Carolina Museum of Art and Penland School of Crafts, includes works that explore time as a theme–real time, virtual time, historical time, recorded time, manipulated time, or the passage of time.

 

This version of the exhibition (which was on-view at the NCMA in the spring and summer of 2013) includes work by Penland instructors Dan Bailey, Jana Brevick, David Chatt, Sonya Clark, Alison Collins and Dan Estabrook.

 

The exhibition opens with a reception on Thursday, November 21, 6-8 pm, at Pratt Manhattan Gallery, 144 West 14th Street. The exhibition runs through January 25, 2014.

 

Artists included in 0 to 60 at Pratt include:

Caetano de Almeida
Dan Bailey
Walead Beshty
Jana Brevick
Paul Chan
David Chatt
Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao
Sonya Clark
Alison Collins
Dan Estabrook
Felix Gonzalez-Torres
Lisa Hoke
Tehching Hsieh
Richard Hughes
Rafeal Lozano-Hemmer
Peter Matthews
David Shapiro

 

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Multiples: Fabrication Through Repetition with Sarah Loertscher

 

loertscherpenland2

Image courtesy of Sarah Loertscher.

Metalsmith, jeweler, and former Penland core fellow Sarah Loertscher will return to Penland this spring to teach a workshop in the metals studio. Elaine Bleakney corresponded with her about the workshop, her work, and its deep ties to landscape.

 
 

I think a lot about the way poems build through repetition, and how when a poet repeats a phrase, the phrase invokes the possibility of a form emerging for the poem at large. Do you have similar feelings about the creation of visual forms in your work?

Yes. Since being a core fellow at Penland, the idea of a starting place (in my case, usually a repeating shape) has been at the heart of my making experience.

It started as a coping mechanism while I was a student Penland–we were exposed to so many new instructors and techniques in such a short time, and I wanted to jump into making, not figuring out what to make. At the time, I would use the triangle and the hexagon–so no matter what class I was in, I would just start making one of those shapes out of metal, clay, paper, glass. It got me working.

It’s still the same experience today–I love the repetition of forms, and some days I just want to build the same building blocks over and over again, and other times I want to build with them. The building part is really organic–the pieces dictate how they want to grow. The hardest part is knowing when I’m done building and when I need to finish it. It’s somehow collaborative–like I help bring a piece into the world, not that I create it.

 
 

loertscherpenland1

Image courtesy of Sarah Loertscher.

 

Using a shape–and getting people working, and building, through repetition–will be the focus of the workshop. We are working on getting out from obsessing over one precious piece. This really stunts learning, because after a point you begin to be scared of taking chances and “ruining” what you started.

I want the workshop to be a really active one, where people are moving through processes and learning through experience. We’ll dive into deeper projects later in the workshop, but the core of the class is going to be experiencing different processes and understanding what you love (or dislike) about each technique.

 
 

Sarah Loertscher
Multiples: Fabrication Through Repetition
In the metals studio
This workshop will focus on fabrication using repetition to build familiarity with materials and techniques. We’ll cover the basics—piercing, filing, riveting, cold connections, soldering—and advanced techniques like hollow construction (sheet and wire), inlay (solder, resin, wood, and soft stone), enameling, and steel fabrication. This workshop is perfect for beginners as well as experienced students interested in creating a production line or new body of work. The emphasis will be on honing skills and creating meaningful, well-designed jewelry and objects. All levels.

 

To find out more and register for this workshop click here.
Spring scholarship deadline is November 29.
Please note: applications need to be at Penland by this date to be considered for scholarship. Overnight service may not deliver to Penland’s campus on time, please plan accordingly.

 
 

loertscherpenland3

Image courtesy of Sarah Loertscher.

 

In your artist statement you talk about the expansive Midwestern landscape you grew up in as providing a backdrop for forms to impress you. Do you miss this, living and working in an urban environment, and do you find forms in the urban landscape that inspire you now?

You know, I do miss it.  The urban environment feeds me in different ways, mainly through interaction and opportunity. The density of Seattle brings together the opportunity of collaboration and exposure, among other things.  For example, this last weekend we pulled off a photo shoot where we had professional make up artists, stylists, models, and a photographer, and mostly from our circle of friends and acquaintances. That would be hard to pull off last minute in a rural setting. Seattle has also helped me expand my studio through interested students and apprentices, and given me teaching opportunities and press.  The social landscape is beautiful, and rich in designers, makers, and people who appreciate those things.  The surrounding physical landscape is also breathtakingly beautiful, but is usually just seen from afar–a beautiful backdrop of mountains and water.

 
 

Sarah Loertscher teaches and works out of her West Seattle studio. She has taught at Pratt Fine Art Center in Washington. A former Penland core fellow and American Craft Council AltCraft artist, her exhibitions include Velvet daVinci (CA) and Sienna Gallery (MA). Her runway collaboration with Angel Sanchez appeared at New York Fashion Week 2013 and a collaboration with Mila Hermanovski at Los Angeles Fashion Week 2012. She might be watching this right now:
 

 

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Photo(s) of the Week: Drama in the Glass Shop

The Penland Glass studio

A component of the fall glass Concentration, taught by Matthew Szösz, was an exploration of the material properties of glass, which include, in its molten state, light, heat, and fluidity. During the workshop’s final critique, studio assistant Leana Quade, with help from the instructor and several of her studiomates, did a performance based on these properties.

 

Penland School Glass Studio

With the lights doused and using the last bit of glass in the furnace, Quade and Matthew slowly poured ribbons of glass into a tall, water-filled box with one transparent side, creating fleeting vertical patterns that changed in character as the water heated up. (Photos by Robin Dreyer)

 

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